Japanese School in Mexico City final 

Hi,

It’s been busy this last month, and to be honest, I procrastinated a little bit so I didn’t update anything about the Japanese course. Guess what? I am actually in Japan right now but that’ll come up later on.

After 3 weeks of TPR and writing the conversation and culture lessons started.

Conversation classes consisted of a particular situation and what to ask (in our case what NOT to say). Helpful situations like:

Buying train tickets using the booth.

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Getting help buying tickets

Hotel reservations and lodging

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How to tell your supervisor you feel sick and you need to go to the hospital.

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Visiting a Japanese house: basic manners of course you need to take off your shoes and also it is expected to bring an omiyage. Usually you say “tsumaranai monodesuga…” you are literally saying the thing you are giving is boring (who knows?).

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Going to the post office, sending a package.

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My two favorites were the conbini

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And of course ordering at MacDonald’s

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Ordering at Mac Donald’s

My family has bullied me already because I went to MacDonald’s, but they had the Sakura drink.

When you go to a restaurant, store or wherever you are a customer you are treated with so much respect that even the grammar is different. The sensei used real phrases used by clerks but so far I can barely understand the main idea of what I’ve been told when I go to a restaurant. Check the Japanese polite form.

During culture classes we were taught how to behave in different situations, we got to know a little of what Japan has to offer to the world in terms of art and food! Some things I didn’t even know existed.

The sensei also talked some about Japanese crafts like the kokeshi dolls. What is interesting of the daruma is when you buy one it has only one eye, then you set yourself a goal and once is reached you draw the remaining eye, isn’t that nice and sort of weird ^^?

Also noh theater, kabuki, ikebana, paintings. Fun fact, kabuki theater is only played by men.

Typical food of Japan including how to use the chopsticks hehe

We even got a introduction on how to fill forms: write your name, address, job, age. I didn’t even know there was such thing as the Japanese calendar. My year of birth is Showa 62 BTW.

How to use the ATM, as my previous experience in Japan I only used the 7-eleven ATM which happens to have a language button, but know that I got a cash card from the SMBC I’ve only used Japanese ATMs and of course I am talking about the one in the lobby with the instructions written in English on how to use it -_-

How to behave in an onsen, this caused awkwardness as most of my classmates didn’t know you have to be naked to enter the onsen. And the same for sentou.

Anyways, 7 weeks passed really fast we were 32 students and this was the final score:

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Final Score

As I mentioned in other posts. We were split in halves so from left to right Cartel group score and both Yakuza and Cartel average.

I think it went OK for 7 weeks 75 over 100. I don’t know what were the scores of the guys in intermediate level though maybe that helped to improve the  overall average.What are your thoughts?

Grammar, Listening, Conversation, Total. These are my grades BTW.

NataliaScore
Final Test grades

Sure 7 weeks passed fast it was really fun.

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Cartel group

There was a closing ceremony, we got  a diploma, obentou in a Japanese restaurant in Mexico City.

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The sensei and me

The CONACYT course was really really basic but in the end you are able to read and write hiragana and katakana. Understand past and no-past tense and some adjectives.

And for me I loved the 7:00AM class I learnt a lot, I improved my writing and learnt another 80+ kanjis (I only knew about 20).

Who knows if someone reads this but I am really grateful thanks to the people from ICMJ I hope they don’t mind I posted pictures of them.

-Natalia

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